P-Plate Approved Cars: Complete List of P-Plater Car Restrictions

P Plate 1

There is an unnecessarily confusing mix of P-plate car restrictions in Australia that determines what constitutes P-plate legal cars, and what doesn’t.

The good news is that there are plenty of P-plate approved cars on the market for red and green P drivers, although those with a need for speed may be left disappointed since P-plate legal V8 cars and legal P-plate turbo cars are usually only available to performance-car aficionados once they’re granted their full licence.

 

Wondering what P-plate legal cars WA has to offer?

If you’re on your P plates in the Northern Territory, ACT, Tasmania or Western Australia, you’re in better luck: there are no P-plate laws that restrict what type of vehicle you drive.

If you’re from another state or territory, there are strict guidelines around P-plater approved cars, including high-performance turbocharged, supercharged and V8-powered cars being a complete no-go in most instances (although in some places, some of the aforementioned cars may be on a P-plate legal car list since requirements are based on guidelines around power-to-weight ratio for P-platers).

There is, however, a loophole for a P-plate exemption on high-performance cars: if you can prove the car is legitimately used for work purposes, then driving one is allowed.

If you’re a P-plater and you’re wondering why you’re being picked on, it comes down to statistics, which show that P-platers are more likely to be involved in a road accident.

Removing access to high-powered cars, obviously, removes some of the inherent danger involved when an inexperienced driver is behind the wheel of a vehicle that requires a certain level of experience to drive.

This, of course, doesn’t take into account constantly evolving car safety features, which means there have been voices calling for state governments to rethink their policies in regards to P-platers.

VicRoads adjusted its policy back in 2012 when it announced that P-platers were permitted to drive vehicles with a power-to-weight ratio of up to 130kW/1000kg, a rule change that came about due to the introduction of vehicles with small-capacity turbocharged engines.

Below you’ll find a handy guide to P-plate vehicle restrictions state-by-state, which will give you an idea of what the best P-plate approved cars are.

 

P-plate legal cars NSW

These high-performance cars are banned for P1/P2 license holders:

• Power-to-weight ratios of greater than 130kW per tonne or

• Modified engines that need to be approved by an engineer or

• Other vehicles classified as high-performance.

Search for P-plate approved cars in NSW here.

 

P-plate legal cars VIC

Similar to NSW, cars not allowed include:

• A power-to-mass ratio of greater than 130kW per tonne or

• An engine that has been modified to increase performance (other than a modification made by the manufacturer during the vehicle’s manufacture) or

• Been declared as probationary prohibited in the Victorian Government Gazette.

Find a P-plate legal cars list from VicRoads and other information here.

 

P-plate legal cars SA

South Australia’s laws prohibit a P-plater driving a car if:

• The vehicle has a power-to-weight ratio greater than 130kW per tonne or

• A vehicle that has been modified to alter engine performance for vehicles manufactured before 1 January 2010, South Australia prohibits P platers from driving the vehicle if it has:

• Greater than or equal to eight cylinders or

• A turbocharged or supercharged engine (except diesel-powered vehicles with less than eight cylinders) or

• A vehicle that has been modified to increase engine performance (other than vehicles that have been so modified by the manufacturer in the course of manufacture of the vehicle) or

• Been nominated as a high-powered vehicle as listed in the South Australian Government Gazette.

If you’re a provisional license holder over the age of 25, these rules do not apply.

More information here.

 

P-plate legal cars QLD

Under-25s are restricted from driving a vehicle built after January 1, 2010 if:

• It has a power-to-weight ratio of more than 130kW/tonne or

• An engine modification that is not approved under section 13 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Vehicle Standards and Safety) Regulation 2010.

Under-25s are restricted from driving a vehicle built before January 1, 2010 if:

• It has an engine with eight or more cylinders or

• A turbocharged or supercharged engine that is not diesel powered or

• An engine with a power output of more than 210kW or

• A rotary engine with an engine capacity of more than 1146cc or

• An engine modification that is not approved under section 13 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Vehicle Standards and Safety) Regulation 2010.

More details here.

By Stephen Corby

 

*Disclaimer: Prices, features, warranties and other information that may be shown in this editorial content (Review Information) is to be used as a guide only and is based on information provided to Carsguide Autotrader Media Solutions Pty Ltd (CAMS) both by third party sources and the car manufacturer at the time of publication. The Review Information was correct at the time of publication. CAMS does not warrant or represent that the Review Information is accurate, reliable, complete, current or suitable for any particular purpose. You should not use or rely upon the Review Information without conducting an independent assessment and valuation of the vehicle.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.