Will fuel run out if we continue at this pace?

Electric Cars

Despite its booming consumption, David Eyton, BP Group Head of Technology reported
Energy resources are plentiful. Concerns over running out of oil and gas have disappeared”.
Savvy Australians are starting to seek alternatives to our reliance on fossil fuels. Whether as a direct result of government policies in relation to carbon emissions, the focus on global warming, or our intrigue with new inventive modes of transport, attention on the electric car is gaining momentum worldwide.
 
The changing landscape sees those nostalgic amongst us choose to keep petrol or gas-fuelled vehicles whilst others seek out the pros that electric vehicles (EV) offer. EVs have come a long way and as of 2018, the range of cars appearing in the mix varies, boasting badges including BMW, Nissan, Hyundai and of course Telsa.

Difference between an electric and a hybrid car

One key point of difference between a hybrid vehicle and an electric one is that a hybrid car gets its power from a mixture of sources; electric and conventional fuel. The electric car is powered only by a battery electric source.

Benefits enjoyed with an electric car

There are plenty of reasons why electric or hybrid vehicles are taking the world by storm. EVs are cheaper to run over their petrol-fuelled counterparts, however, what stands out is their positive output on the environment. As technology developments are being seen, safety benefits too are on the rise and the distance that an electric vehicle can travel has improved.
 
Despite these pros, both new and used electric and hybrid vehicles are more expensive than alternative transportation and more expensive in Australia compared to car markets around the world where these vehicles are more established. But that does not mean that an electric car is out of reach.
 
Here are the latest Telsa electric/hybrid cars up for sale on Gumtree:
 
Behyad Jafari, the CEO of the Electric Vehicle Council was quoted as saying
By 2025, every new vehicle sold in Australia will be a plug-in, and by 2030 half the fleet may well be electric.
Not sure where to start? Take a look at this comprehensive Electric Cars Buying Guide and when you are ready to browse the range of new and used electric vehicles for sale, click here.

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